Everyone should occasionally break the law

in some small and delightful way,
it’s good for the hygiene of the brain."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



Cheeky & Geeky Se Moi;

Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


DISCLAIMER: I do not own the photos published here, unless stated.

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ricray:

A Corbett’s tiger, or Indochinese tiger. dries off after diving into the water at Khao Kheow Open Zoo in Chonburi, Thailand.
Only 200 Corbett’s tiger’s are thought to exist in the wild. They are found in Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Thailand, and Vietnam - and formerly in China. The last known wild Indochinese tiger in China was killed and eaten by people from a village called Mengla in 2009.

ricray:

A Corbett’s tiger, or Indochinese tiger. dries off after diving into the water at Khao Kheow Open Zoo in Chonburi, Thailand.


Only 200 Corbett’s tiger’s are thought to exist in the wild. They are found in Cambodia, Laos, Burma, Thailand, and Vietnam - and formerly in China. The last known wild Indochinese tiger in China was killed and eaten by people from a village called Mengla in 2009.

(Source: telegraph.co.uk, via imgfave)

photo


They have been found where the earth meets the sky, high up on the moorlands of northern England, a mysterious series of strange and ancient carvings hewn into the rocks and boulders. 
More than 100 elaborate carvings dating back thousands of years have been discovered on rocks and boulders in the North of England.
The art, thought to be the work of Neolithic man, is open to the air but is so remote that it had lain undisturbed and undetected for thousands of years  -  until it was recently discovered by English Heritage.
It  includes a series of intricate designs of concentric circles, interlocking rings and hollowed cups.
They are among only 2,500 examples which exist in England - having survived natural erosion, quarrying and field clearance.
Enlarge  
Volunteers have found more than 100 examples of ancient rock art in places like the Ketley Crag in Northumberland
Around 100 volunteers, trained by English Heritage, have been recording the location, content, context and condition of rock art for the last four years as part of pilot project.
During the Neolithic period, 4,000 to 6,000 years ago, man moved away from the roaming existence of the hunter-gatherer who traversed the country, following his prey, to a more settled existence. 
New Stone Age man preferred to stay put, tending cereals and domestic animals.How all of this fitted in with the abstract curves of their rock carvings is anyone’s guess. 
Mysterious presence: A carved boulder at Baildon Moor, West Yorks
It’s not possible to date the art itself, but its age can be assessed by the context in which it is found. For example, if it is near burial sites which took the form of large cairns or long mounds in which people are buried in groups, it is more likely to date back to the New Stone Age.
The most interesting discovery includes a large carved panel found on a sandstone boulder on Barningham Moor, a 300m-high (984ft) area of Co Durham, on the edge of the Pennines.
It features abstract carvings — interlocking grooves and hollowed cups with surrounding circles. Tools of stone or bone were used to carve the symbols and the work is so well preserved that the ‘peck’ marks are still visible.
Enlarge  
Barningham Moor has revealed an elaborately carved panel
Kate Wilson, inspector of ancient monuments at English Heritage, said: ‘There are many theories as to what rock art carvings mean. They may have played a role in fire, feastings and offering activities, or been used as signposts, or to mark territory.
'They may have a spiritual significance. In hunter-gatherer communities those places where mountains touch the sky or the sea reaches the shore are often considered the domain of supernatural ancestors. Most rock art is found in those areas.'
She said that the Neolithic Age saw the arrival of ‘a fairly sophisticated culture’, with the introduction of agriculture. ‘They were settling and cultivating something,’ she added. 
Enlarge  Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1041340/Revealed-Britains-secret-treasure-trove-stone-age-rock-art.html#ixzz1as0dP3Ka

They have been found where the earth meets the sky, high up on the moorlands of northern England, a mysterious series of strange and ancient carvings hewn into the rocks and boulders. 

More than 100 elaborate carvings dating back thousands of years have been discovered on rocks and boulders in the North of England.

The art, thought to be the work of Neolithic man, is open to the air but is so remote that it had lain undisturbed and undetected for thousands of years  -  until it was recently discovered by English Heritage.

It  includes a series of intricate designs of concentric circles, interlocking rings and hollowed cups.

They are among only 2,500 examples which exist in England - having survived natural erosion, quarrying and field clearance.

Enlarge  

Volunteers have found more than 100 examples of ancient rock art in places like the Ketley Crag in Northumberland

Around 100 volunteers, trained by English Heritage, have been recording the location, content, context and condition of rock art for the last four years as part of pilot project.

During the Neolithic period, 4,000 to 6,000 years ago, man moved away from the roaming existence of the hunter-gatherer who traversed the country, following his prey, to a more settled existence. 

New Stone Age man preferred to stay put, tending cereals and domestic animals.How all of this fitted in with the abstract curves of their rock carvings is anyone’s guess. 

carvings

Mysterious presence: A carved boulder at Baildon Moor, West Yorks

It’s not possible to date the art itself, but its age can be assessed by the context in which it is found. For example, if it is near burial sites which took the form of large cairns or long mounds in which people are buried in groups, it is more likely to date back to the New Stone Age.

The most interesting discovery includes a large carved panel found on a sandstone boulder on Barningham Moor, a 300m-high (984ft) area of Co Durham, on the edge of the Pennines.

It features abstract carvings — interlocking grooves and hollowed cups with surrounding circles. Tools of stone or bone were used to carve the symbols and the work is so well preserved that the ‘peck’ marks are still visible.

Enlarge  Barningham Moor

Barningham Moor has revealed an elaborately carved panel

Kate Wilson, inspector of ancient monuments at English Heritage, said: ‘There are many theories as to what rock art carvings mean. They may have played a role in fire, feastings and offering activities, or been used as signposts, or to mark territory.

'They may have a spiritual significance. In hunter-gatherer communities those places where mountains touch the sky or the sea reaches the shore are often considered the domain of supernatural ancestors. Most rock art is found in those areas.'

She said that the Neolithic Age saw the arrival of ‘a fairly sophisticated culture’, with the introduction of agriculture. ‘They were settling and cultivating something,’ she added. 

Enlarge  rock art

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1041340/Revealed-Britains-secret-treasure-trove-stone-age-rock-art.html#ixzz1as0dP3Ka

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blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: “The American Way of Life,” shot in 1937 by the great photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White,              and now on view at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, in a show of gems of modernist photography. (I Daily Pic’d from the same show earlier this week.)  The great thing about the photos in this show is that  they do a perfect job of marrying the compositional play of great  modernist abstraction, guaranteed to grab the eye, with subjects that  deserve being eyeballed.
Bourke-White’s image still has the power to shock, and to remind us that, almost 75 years on, we are still – or once again – facing a huge gap between our bouncy American self-image and dreams and a harsh reality that often has little to do with either.  The painful side of this photo: It reminds us of how little progress we’ve made, and of how there’s even been backsliding in our concern for economic justice and equality. The upside: In the depths of the Great Depression, it must have seemed that the country was suffering an inexorable slide. And it wasn’t.
The Daily Pic, along with more global art news, can also be found on the  Art Beast page at thedailybeast.com.
(Image courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  Polaroid Foundation Purchase Fund, © Estate of Margaret Bourke‑White/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

blakegopnik:

Daily Pic: “The American Way of Life,” shot in 1937 by the great photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White,  and now on view at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, in a show of gems of modernist photography. (I Daily Pic’d from the same show earlier this week.) The great thing about the photos in this show is that they do a perfect job of marrying the compositional play of great modernist abstraction, guaranteed to grab the eye, with subjects that deserve being eyeballed.

Bourke-White’s image still has the power to shock, and to remind us that, almost 75 years on, we are still – or once again – facing a huge gap between our bouncy American self-image and dreams and a harsh reality that often has little to do with either.  The painful side of this photo: It reminds us of how little progress we’ve made, and of how there’s even been backsliding in our concern for economic justice and equality. The upside: In the depths of the Great Depression, it must have seemed that the country was suffering an inexorable slide. And it wasn’t.

The Daily Pic, along with more global art news, can also be found on the  Art Beast page at thedailybeast.com.

(Image courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  Polaroid Foundation Purchase Fund, © Estate of Margaret Bourke‑White/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

(via lustik)