Everyone should occasionally break the law

in some small and delightful way,
it’s good for the hygiene of the brain."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



Cheeky & Geeky Se Moi;

Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


DISCLAIMER: I do not own the photos published here, unless stated.

photo

Strange plants of Socotra Island

It is like being on a different planet… These pictures and information are excellent viewing and reading. Socotra Island: You have to see it to believe it. This island simply blows away any notion about what is considered “normal” for a landscape on Earth .  Imagine waking up on the Socotra Island < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socotra > and taking a good look around you. After a yelp of disbelief, you’d be inclined to think you were transported to another planet - or traveled to another era of Earth’s history. The second would be closer to the truth for this island, which is part of a group of four islands, has been geographically isolated from mainland Africa for the last 6 or 7 million years. Like the Galapagos Islands, this island is teeming with 700 extremely rare species of flora and fauna, a full 1/3 of which are endemic, i.e. found nowhere else on Earth.   The climate is harsh, hot, and dry, and yet - the most amazing plant life thrives there. Situated in the Indian Ocean 250 km from Somalia and 340 km from Yemen, the wide sandy beaches rise to limestone plateaus full of caves (some 7 kmin length) and mountains up to 1,525 metres high.  The name Socotra is derived from a Sanskrit name, meaning “The Island of Bliss”… Is it the beaches? The isolation and quiet? Or the strange and crazy botanical allure? Alien-looking plants: H.P. Lovecraft’s secret inspiration? Was the famous Chtulhu myths creator aware of these forbidding mountains with their hauntingly weird flora (think of plant mutations from his “The Colour Out of Space”)? We’re almost tempted to call Socotra the other “Mountains of Madness” - the trees and plants of this island were preserved through the long geological isolation, some varieties being 20 million years old… We begin with the dracena cinnibaris or Dragon’s Blood Tree, the source of valuable resin for varnishes, dyes, and “cure-all” medicine; also (predictably) used in medieval ritual magic and alchemy.  The branches spread out into the sky and from below appear to hover over the landscape like so many flying saucers… and from above, they have a distinct mushroom look:   There is also the Desert Rose (adenium obesium) which looks like nothing so much as a blooming elephant leg:   Dorstenia gigas - apparently does not require any soil and sinks roots straight into the bare rock: 
 
(via Strange plants of Socotra Island)

Strange plants of Socotra Island

It is like being on a different planet… These pictures and information are excellent viewing and reading. Socotra Island: You have to see it to believe it. This island simply blows away any notion about what is considered “normal” for a landscape on Earth 

 

Imagine waking up on the Socotra Island < http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socotra > and taking a good look around you. After a yelp of disbelief, you’d be inclined to think you were transported to another planet - or traveled to another era of Earth’s history. The second would be closer to the truth for this island, which is part of a group of four islands, has been geographically isolated from mainland Africa for the last 6 or 7 million years. Like the Galapagos Islands, this island is teeming with 700 extremely rare species of flora and fauna, a full 1/3 of which are endemic, i.e. found nowhere else on Earth. 

 
 

The climate is harsh, hot, and dry, and yet - the most amazing plant life thrives there. Situated in the Indian Ocean 250 km from Somalia and 340 km from Yemen, the wide sandy beaches rise to limestone plateaus full of caves (some 7 kmin length) and mountains up to 1,525 metres high. 

 

The name Socotra is derived from a Sanskrit name, meaning “The Island of Bliss”… Is it the beaches? The isolation and quiet? Or the strange and crazy botanical allure? Alien-looking plants: H.P. Lovecraft’s secret inspiration? 

Was the famous Chtulhu myths creator aware of these forbidding mountains with their hauntingly weird flora (think of plant mutations from his “The Colour Out of Space”)? We’re almost tempted to call Socotra the other “Mountains of Madness” - the trees and plants of this island were preserved through the long geological isolation, some varieties being 20 million years old… We begin with the dracena cinnibaris or Dragon’s Blood Tree, the source of valuable resin for varnishes, dyes, and “cure-all” medicine; also (predictably) used in medieval ritual magic and alchemy. 


 

The branches spread out into the sky and from below appear to hover over the landscape like so many flying saucers… and from above, they have a distinct mushroom look: 

 

 

There is also the Desert Rose (adenium obesium) which looks like nothing so much as a blooming elephant leg: 

 

 

Dorstenia gigas - apparently does not require any soil and sinks roots straight into the bare rock: 

 

(via Strange plants of Socotra Island)

photo


Fong Qi Wei knows he cannot stop time, but that hasn’t stopped him from harnessing it to create elaborate prints that capture its passage.


For his latest series, “Time Is a Dimension” the Singapore-based photographer spends from two to four hours at a time shooting locations during sunrise and sunset to record dramatic shifts in light that offer maximum contrast. Once he has the images, Fong then layers the various exposures digitally to create collage prints that illustrate the relationship between time and light.

Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013
Fong Qi Wei




Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013
Fong Qi Wei




Marina Sunset, 2013
Fong Qi Wei




(via Fong Qi Wei: “Time Is a Dimension” are photographic collages that mark the passage of time (PHOTOS).)

Fong Qi Wei knows he cannot stop time, but that hasn’t stopped him from harnessing it to create elaborate prints that capture its passage.

For his latest series, “Time Is a Dimension” the Singapore-based photographer spends from two to four hours at a time shooting locations during sunrise and sunset to record dramatic shifts in light that offer maximum contrast. Once he has the images, Fong then layers the various exposures digitally to create collage prints that illustrate the relationship between time and light.

Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013
Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013

Fong Qi Wei

Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013

Fong Qi Wei

Marina Sunset, 2013
Marina Sunset, 2013

Fong Qi Wei

(via Fong Qi Wei: “Time Is a Dimension” are photographic collages that mark the passage of time (PHOTOS).)

photo

Photographer James Friedman doesn’t play golf, but he had a collection of golf balls lying around. One day, he began to wonder what the guts of the golf balls look like, so he cut a ball open to take a peek at a core. Then he sliced open another, and another; after cutting open over twenty different types of golf balls, Friedman found a strange sort of beauty that he began to document through photographs. The resulting project is titled “Interior Design“.
The photographs reveal a tiny world of strange shapes, layers, and colors. The Ohio-based photographer says that he was surprised to find “elegant formal qualities, unpredictable color schemes and metaphor” in the “unlikeliest of places.”
Some of the balls have guts that look like something you’d see when peering into a microscope in a laboratory. Others look like illustrations showing cross sections of planets. Others look like abstract circles of color and texture.
Here’s the collection of golf ball photographs Friedman created:




This project led Friedman to become more interested in the subject of abstraction. He ordinarily works as a documentary photographer, he says that these abstract photos of tiny-scale objects are an “exciting corollary” to his other work.
If you enjoyed these images, be sure to check out photographer Sabine Pearlman’s cross section photographs of bullets.
(via Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within)

Photographer James Friedman doesn’t play golf, but he had a collection of golf balls lying around. One day, he began to wonder what the guts of the golf balls look like, so he cut a ball open to take a peek at a core. Then he sliced open another, and another; after cutting open over twenty different types of golf balls, Friedman found a strange sort of beauty that he began to document through photographs. The resulting project is titled “Interior Design“.

The photographs reveal a tiny world of strange shapes, layers, and colors. The Ohio-based photographer says that he was surprised to find “elegant formal qualities, unpredictable color schemes and metaphor” in the “unlikeliest of places.”

Some of the balls have guts that look like something you’d see when peering into a microscope in a laboratory. Others look like illustrations showing cross sections of planets. Others look like abstract circles of color and texture.

Here’s the collection of golf ball photographs Friedman created:

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 1

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 2

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 3

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 23

This project led Friedman to become more interested in the subject of abstraction. He ordinarily works as a documentary photographer, he says that these abstract photos of tiny-scale objects are an “exciting corollary” to his other work.

If you enjoyed these images, be sure to check out photographer Sabine Pearlman’s cross section photographs of bullets.

(via Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within)

photo

FACTS SO ROMANTIC ON CULTURE
Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee
There is more to the world than meets the human eye, a fact that hit home for the 18th-century astronomer Sir Frederick William Herschel when he discovered infrared light—a wavelength of light that lies just outside the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We can feel its heat, but we can’t see the light—not without special equipment designed to be sensitive in this regime.
(via Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus)

FACTS SO ROMANTIC ON CULTURE

Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee

There is more to the world than meets the human eye, a fact that hit home for the 18th-century astronomer Sir Frederick William Herschel when he discovered infrared light—a wavelength of light that lies just outside the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We can feel its heat, but we can’t see the light—not without special equipment designed to be sensitive in this regime.

(via Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus)

photo

Harley Davidson National Rally in China
Last weekend, Reuters photographer Carlos Barria traveled to Zheijiang Province, China, to photograph some of the 1,000 Harley Davidson enthusiasts who attended China&#8217;s 5th annual Harley Davidson National Rally, part of the company&#8217;s 110-year anniversary. Harley Davidson only began official sales in China in 2005, and its bikes are considered to be luxury items by Chinese tax authorities, so they are taxed at extremely high rates &#8212; a 2013 motorcycle might sell for 200,000 yuan ($32,500), approximately four times the average annual salary in Beijing. Transportation authorities have also placed Harleys in the same category as electric bikes, horses and bicycles, so they cannot be ridden on highways and major avenues. [18 photos]


(via Harley Davidson National Rally in China - In Focus - The Atlantic)

Harley Davidson National Rally in China

Last weekend, Reuters photographer Carlos Barria traveled to Zheijiang Province, China, to photograph some of the 1,000 Harley Davidson enthusiasts who attended China’s 5th annual Harley Davidson National Rally, part of the company’s 110-year anniversary. Harley Davidson only began official sales in China in 2005, and its bikes are considered to be luxury items by Chinese tax authorities, so they are taxed at extremely high rates — a 2013 motorcycle might sell for 200,000 yuan ($32,500), approximately four times the average annual salary in Beijing. Transportation authorities have also placed Harleys in the same category as electric bikes, horses and bicycles, so they cannot be ridden on highways and major avenues. [18 photos]

image

image

(via Harley Davidson National Rally in China - In Focus - The Atlantic)

photo

Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy
Photographer Matej Peljhan puts a twist on classic children&#8217;s book The Little Prince with a touching series featuring a 12-year-old boy living with muscular dystrophy.
Luka&#8217;s degenerative disease restricts his physical movement to only small gestures made with his hands. He cannot bathe, dress or feed himself, but he still manages to use his limited movements — and unlimited imagination — to sketch on small pieces of paper.

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan
(via Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy [PICS])

Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy

Photographer Matej Peljhan puts a twist on classic children’s book The Little Prince with a touching series featuring a 12-year-old boy living with muscular dystrophy.

Luka’s degenerative disease restricts his physical movement to only small gestures made with his hands. He cannot bathe, dress or feed himself, but he still manages to use his limited movements — and unlimited imagination — to sketch on small pieces of paper.

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

(via Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy [PICS])

photo

 Red Star Motel is the clever, action-packed series by Beijing photographer Chi Lei, “Chili”, that reads like an unraveling drama brimming with sex, drugs, murder and chaos. Each scene is set in an identical divey Beijing motel room where Chili supplies us with plenty of voyeuristic moments to witness. The images are linked together through subtle visual clues that have been woven throughout, encouraging the viewer to take part and piece together the story.

 Red Star Motel is the clever, action-packed series by Beijing photographer Chi Lei, “Chili”, that reads like an unraveling drama brimming with sex, drugs, murder and chaos. Each scene is set in an identical divey Beijing motel room where Chili supplies us with plenty of voyeuristic moments to witness. The images are linked together through subtle visual clues that have been woven throughout, encouraging the viewer to take part and piece together the story.

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

photo

Thai photographer Benz Thanachart caused quite a stir in his country this past summer with an unusual photo project titled Smartphone. For each photo, he boarded a subway train, screamed a completely random word, and snapped a photograph to document the passengers’ startled reactions. The photograph above was captured after Thanachart shouted “Fried egg!”Here’s Thanachart’s description of the project:

After staying in New York City for one year, I went back to Thailand on summer 2012. The biggest thing I first noticed was that several people now own smartphone. On the public transportation, they were always obsessed with the little personal space on their hand. Everybody was facing down and being cut off from the outside world. At that time although I was being in my hometown, the feeling of unfamiliarity gradually emerged. So I decided to do something to express that disoriented emotion. I got into the subway, shouted out a random word that is completely unrelated to the situation and then captured that moment. It was the moment when everyone was getting out of their small worlds and noticing the presence of public space.







“Kale!”

“Morning Glory!”

“Tokyo Tower!”

“Crocodile!”

“Hokkaido!”

“Stingray!”

“The Final Picture!”

“Omelette!”

You can find more of Thanachart’s work on his website and through his Facebook page.
Thanks for sending in the tip, Pocky!
Image credits: Photographs by Benz Thanachart and used with permission









 




 
Read more at http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/06/photographer-snaps-surprised-reactions-after-words-shouting-on-subway-trains/#GSD2mCBG8tZrXxwG.99 
Read more at http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/06/photographer-snaps-surprised-reactions-after-words-shouting-on-subway-trains/#GSD2mCBG8tZrXxwG.99 
(via Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains)

Thai photographer Benz Thanachart caused quite a stir in his country this past summer with an unusual photo project titled Smartphone. For each photo, he boarded a subway train, screamed a completely random word, and snapped a photograph to document the passengers’ startled reactions. The photograph above was captured after Thanachart shouted “Fried egg!”

Here’s Thanachart’s description of the project:

After staying in New York City for one year, I went back to Thailand on summer 2012. The biggest thing I first noticed was that several people now own smartphone. On the public transportation, they were always obsessed with the little personal space on their hand. Everybody was facing down and being cut off from the outside world. At that time although I was being in my hometown, the feeling of unfamiliarity gradually emerged. So I decided to do something to express that disoriented emotion. I got into the subway, shouted out a random word that is completely unrelated to the situation and then captured that moment. It was the moment when everyone was getting out of their small worlds and noticing the presence of public space.


Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains kale

“Kale!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains morningglory

“Morning Glory!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains tokyotower

“Tokyo Tower!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains crocodile

“Crocodile!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains hokkaido

“Hokkaido!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains stingray

“Stingray!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains thefinalpicture

“The Final Picture!”

Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains omelette

“Omelette!”

You can find more of Thanachart’s work on his website and through his Facebook page.


Thanks for sending in the tip, Pocky!


Image credits: Photographs by Benz Thanachart and used with permission


     


    Read more at http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/06/photographer-snaps-surprised-reactions-after-words-shouting-on-subway-trains/#GSD2mCBG8tZrXxwG.99 


    Read more at http://www.petapixel.com/2012/11/06/photographer-snaps-surprised-reactions-after-words-shouting-on-subway-trains/#GSD2mCBG8tZrXxwG.99 

    (via Photographer Snaps Surprised Reactions After Shouting Words on Subway Trains)