Everyone should occasionally break the law

in some small and delightful way,
it’s good for the hygiene of the brain."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



Cheeky & Geeky Se Moi;

Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


DISCLAIMER: I do not own the photos published here, unless stated.

photo

While it’s cool that this silicone character can secure your instant noodles when they’re cooking, the cooler part is that the figure changes color after three minutes. You’ll never have to repeatedly check your phone to see how long your Cup Noodles have been cooking again.
 
Japan has a reputation for producing some downright weird stuff.
In fact, the word “chindogu” even refers to inventions that are technically practical, but utterly eccentric in their execution. These products are so bizarre, they’re not actually meant to be produced.
SEE ALSO: Eyeball Licking: Japan’s Craziest New Fetish
But many questionably useful Japanese products actually exist in circulation, and we’re defending some of the “strange” ones. Sure, they may be a bit excessive — but useless? Not quite.
1. Banana Keeper




Image courtesy of Daiso
Have you ever experienced a squished banana at the bottom of your bag? Not fun. Not fun at all.
2. Urusakunai Kara OK! Mute Microphone USB




Image courtesy of JTT
Admittedly, this microphone looks ridiculous. Fortunately, it is not meant to be used in public.
This gadget is perfect for belting out tunes when you don’t want to disturb your neighbors — or when you just don’t want to hear the sound of your own singing voice. (Your hairbrush can’t do that.)
3. Dictionary Desk Pillow




Image courtesy of Japan Trend Shop
Perfect for a mid-work pick-me-up, or just as a nice, easily portable pillow or seat cushion.
4. Photograph Yourself Arm




Image courtesy of Thanko
Sometimes selfies are really difficult.
5. Easy Butter Former




Image courtesy of Metex
One pat of butter magically transforms into ribbons and ribbons of buttery goodness, so you get a lot more butter for your buck … er, yen.
6. Sound-Catch Cubic Pillow




Image courtesy of Strapya World
This invention allows you to hear music or television shows when lying down. While this probably shouldn’t be an element of your daily media consumption, it’s the kind of thing that could be pretty useful when you’re sick and can only lie in bed all day. Or if you’re just really lazy every day.
(via 10 Weird Japanese Products That Are Actually Kind of Useful)

While it’s cool that this silicone character can secure your instant noodles when they’re cooking, the cooler part is that the figure changes color after three minutes. You’ll never have to repeatedly check your phone to see how long your Cup Noodles have been cooking again.

 

Japan has a reputation for producing some downright weird stuff.

In fact, the word “chindogu” even refers to inventions that are technically practical, but utterly eccentric in their execution. These products are so bizarre, they’re not actually meant to be produced.

But many questionably useful Japanese products actually exist in circulation, and we’re defending some of the “strange” ones. Sure, they may be a bit excessive — but useless? Not quite.

1. Banana Keeper

banana holder case daiso

Image courtesy of Daiso

Have you ever experienced a squished banana at the bottom of your bag? Not fun. Not fun at all.

2. Urusakunai Kara OK! Mute Microphone USB

jtt usb microphone soundproof cup

Image courtesy of JTT

Admittedly, this microphone looks ridiculous. Fortunately, it is not meant to be used in public.

This gadget is perfect for belting out tunes when you don’t want to disturb your neighbors — or when you just don’t want to hear the sound of your own singing voice. (Your hairbrush can’t do that.)

3. Dictionary Desk Pillow

japanese dictionary pillow

Image courtesy of Japan Trend Shop

Perfect for a mid-work pick-me-up, or just as a nice, easily portable pillow or seat cushion.

4. Photograph Yourself Arm

photograph yourself arm smartphone

Image courtesy of Thanko

Sometimes selfies are really difficult.

5. Easy Butter Former

metex easy butter former grater

Image courtesy of Metex

One pat of butter magically transforms into ribbons and ribbons of buttery goodness, so you get a lot more butter for your buck … er, yen.

6. Sound-Catch Cubic Pillow

catch sounds cubic pillow japan lazy

Image courtesy of Strapya World

This invention allows you to hear music or television shows when lying down. While this probably shouldn’t be an element of your daily media consumption, it’s the kind of thing that could be pretty useful when you’re sick and can only lie in bed all day. Or if you’re just really lazy every day.

(via 10 Weird Japanese Products That Are Actually Kind of Useful)

photo

Are the newly redesigned Disney Princesses sending the wrong message? 
Merida, the sweet, independent princess from “Brave,” will officially join the Disney Princess Royal Court on Saturday.Translation from Disney-speak: Merida is about to get her glam on.Off-the-shoulder gown. Eye-liner. Lipstick. Wild red curls tamed into voluminous sexy locks. A coy expression enhanced by her new, fuller lips.This is the Kardashian-ization of the Disney Princess. (oh shit)It can be subtle (Rapunzel) or it can look like cosmetic surgery. Cinderella now looks strangely like Taylor Swift, while poor Belle — I can’t decide if she looks more like Kim, Kourtney or Khloe.Bottom line: When it comes to the cartoon marketing images Disney uses to sell products — everything from toys to clothes to makeup — the princesses rarely resemble the characters we know from the movies.
Read more at ONTD: http://ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com/77528791.html#ixzz2WmZikY2u
(via Oh No They Didn’t! - Are the newly redesigned Disney Princesses sending the wrong message?)

Are the newly redesigned Disney Princesses sending the wrong message? 



Merida, the sweet, independent princess from “Brave,” will officially join the Disney Princess Royal Court on Saturday.

Translation from Disney-speak: Merida is about to get her glam on.

Off-the-shoulder gown. Eye-liner. Lipstick. Wild red curls tamed into voluminous sexy locks. A coy expression enhanced by her new, fuller lips.

This is the Kardashian-ization of the Disney Princess. (oh shit)

It can be subtle (Rapunzel) or it can look like cosmetic surgery. Cinderella now looks strangely like Taylor Swift, while poor Belle — I can’t decide if she looks more like Kim, Kourtney or Khloe.

Bottom line: When it comes to the cartoon marketing images Disney uses to sell products — everything from toys to clothes to makeup — the princesses rarely resemble the characters we know from the movies.

Read more at ONTD: http://ohnotheydidnt.livejournal.com/77528791.html#ixzz2WmZikY2u

(via Oh No They Didn’t! - Are the newly redesigned Disney Princesses sending the wrong message?)

photo

Harley Davidson National Rally in China
Last weekend, Reuters photographer Carlos Barria traveled to Zheijiang Province, China, to photograph some of the 1,000 Harley Davidson enthusiasts who attended China’s 5th annual Harley Davidson National Rally, part of the company’s 110-year anniversary. Harley Davidson only began official sales in China in 2005, and its bikes are considered to be luxury items by Chinese tax authorities, so they are taxed at extremely high rates — a 2013 motorcycle might sell for 200,000 yuan ($32,500), approximately four times the average annual salary in Beijing. Transportation authorities have also placed Harleys in the same category as electric bikes, horses and bicycles, so they cannot be ridden on highways and major avenues. [18 photos]


(via Harley Davidson National Rally in China - In Focus - The Atlantic)

Harley Davidson National Rally in China

Last weekend, Reuters photographer Carlos Barria traveled to Zheijiang Province, China, to photograph some of the 1,000 Harley Davidson enthusiasts who attended China’s 5th annual Harley Davidson National Rally, part of the company’s 110-year anniversary. Harley Davidson only began official sales in China in 2005, and its bikes are considered to be luxury items by Chinese tax authorities, so they are taxed at extremely high rates — a 2013 motorcycle might sell for 200,000 yuan ($32,500), approximately four times the average annual salary in Beijing. Transportation authorities have also placed Harleys in the same category as electric bikes, horses and bicycles, so they cannot be ridden on highways and major avenues. [18 photos]

image

image

(via Harley Davidson National Rally in China - In Focus - The Atlantic)

photo

Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy
Photographer Matej Peljhan puts a twist on classic children’s book The Little Prince with a touching series featuring a 12-year-old boy living with muscular dystrophy.
Luka’s degenerative disease restricts his physical movement to only small gestures made with his hands. He cannot bathe, dress or feed himself, but he still manages to use his limited movements — and unlimited imagination — to sketch on small pieces of paper.

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan





Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan
(via Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy [PICS])

Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy

Photographer Matej Peljhan puts a twist on classic children’s book The Little Prince with a touching series featuring a 12-year-old boy living with muscular dystrophy.

Luka’s degenerative disease restricts his physical movement to only small gestures made with his hands. He cannot bathe, dress or feed himself, but he still manages to use his limited movements — and unlimited imagination — to sketch on small pieces of paper.

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

Image courtesy of Matej Peljhan

(via Photographer Brings to Life Imagination of Boy With Muscular Dystrophy [PICS])

photo

Barbara was a French singer of Jewish descent who wrote Goettingen about a German city she loved.
The post-war reconciliation between France and Germany was enshrined in a treaty signed 50 years ago. But many believe a song recorded the following year did as much to thaw relations.
Can there be many songs that really did change the world?
There have certainly been records which have been immensely popular - and some of those have had a message. But did they really change the hearts and minds of ordinary people? Did they alter politics?
There is one which did, and it’s barely known now.
Fifty years ago, Germany and France were neighbours where the scars of war were still raw.
Germany had invaded France and been repulsed, inch by bloody inch and town by town. Germans were trying to come to terms not just with total defeat, but with how what they thought was their civilized country had perpetrated one of the great crimes of history. Into this minefield of potential resentment and painful rancour, stepped a slight, soft-voiced chanteuse.
Continue reading the main story
Barbara, the woman in black
Born Monique Serf in Paris in 1930
the second child of a Jewish fur salesman
family had to move several times during the German occupation and even fled one home after being denounced as Jews
studied music in Paris and then moved to Brussels, where she first performed under the name of her maternal grandmother
found considerable success in the 1960s and 70s
always dressed in black on stage
acted, directed and campaigned about HIV
death in 1997 sparked outpouring of grief


(via Did this song change the world?)

Barbara was a French singer of Jewish descent who wrote Goettingen about a German city she loved.

The post-war reconciliation between France and Germany was enshrined in a treaty signed 50 years ago. But many believe a song recorded the following year did as much to thaw relations.

Can there be many songs that really did change the world?

There have certainly been records which have been immensely popular - and some of those have had a message. But did they really change the hearts and minds of ordinary people? Did they alter politics?

There is one which did, and it’s barely known now.

Fifty years ago, Germany and France were neighbours where the scars of war were still raw.

Germany had invaded France and been repulsed, inch by bloody inch and town by town. Germans were trying to come to terms not just with total defeat, but with how what they thought was their civilized country had perpetrated one of the great crimes of history. Into this minefield of potential resentment and painful rancour, stepped a slight, soft-voiced chanteuse.

Barbara, the woman in black

  • Born Monique Serf in Paris in 1930
  • the second child of a Jewish fur salesman
  • family had to move several times during the German occupation and even fled one home after being denounced as Jews
  • studied music in Paris and then moved to Brussels, where she first performed under the name of her maternal grandmother
  • found considerable success in the 1960s and 70s
  • always dressed in black on stage
  • acted, directed and campaigned about HIV
  • death in 1997 sparked outpouring of grief


(via Did this song change the world?)

photo


100 Diagrams That Changed the World



A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web.
Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world,perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (UK; public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.
But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinatorial, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines. Christianson writes in the introduction:

It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others. Each was a product and a reflection of its unique cultural, historical and political environment. Each represented specific preoccupations, interests, and stake holders.
[…]
The great diagrams depicted in the book form the basis for many fields — art, astronomy, cartography, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, history, communications, particle physics, and space travel among others. More often than not, however, their creators — mostly known, but many lost to time — were polymaths who are creating new technologies or breakthroughs by drawing from a potent combination of disciplines. By applying trigonometric methods to the heavens, or by harnessing the movement of the sun and the planets to keep time, they were forging powerful new tools; their diagrams were imbued with synergy.





Rosetta Stone (196 BC)
Discovered in 1799, this granite block containing a decree written in three languages allowed Egyptologists to interpret hieroglyphics for the first time — a language that had been out of use since the fourth century AD.






The Ptolemaic System (Claudus Ptolemy, c. AD 140-150)
This 1568 illuminated illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system, ‘Figura dos Corpos Celestes’ (Four Heavenly Bodies), is by the Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velbo.






Ptolemy’s World Map (Claudius Ptolemy, c. AD 150)
In this 15th-century example of the Ptolemaic world map, the Indian Ocean is enclosed and there is no sea route around the Cape. The ‘inhabited’ (Old) World is massively inflated.






Lunar Eclipse (Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, 1019)
An illustration showing the different phases of the moon from al-Biruni’s manuscript copy of his Kitab al-Tafhim (Book of Instruction on the Principles of the Art of Astrology)


Christianson offers a definition:

diagram
From the latin diagramma (figure) from Greek, a figure worked out b lines, plan, from diagraphein, from graphein to write.
First known use of the word: 1619.
A plan, a sketch, drawing, outline, not necessarily representational, designed to demonstrate or explain something or clarify the relationship existing between the parts of the whole.
In mathematics, a graphic representation of an algebraic or geometric relationship. A chart or graph.
A drawing or plan that outlines and explains the parts, operation, etc. of something: a diagram of an engine.





Dante’s Divine Comedy (Dante Alighieri, 1308-21)
A 19th-century interpretation of Dante’s map of Hell. The level of suffering and wickedness increases on the downward journey through the inferno’s nine layers. No original copies of Dante’s manuscript survive.






Vitruvian Man (Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1487
This sketch, and the notes that go with it, show how da Vinci understood the proportions of the human body. The head measured from the forehead to the chin was exactly one tenth of the total height, and the outstretched arms were always as wide as the body was tall.






Human Body (Andreas Vesalius, 1543)
Vesalius’s revolutionary anatomical treatise, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, shows the dissected body in unusually animated poses. These detailed diagrams are perhaps the most famous illustrations in all of medical history.






Heliocentric Universe (Nicolaus Copernicus, 1543)
Copernicus’s revolutionary view of the universe was crystallized in this simple yet disconcerting line drawing. His heliocentric model — which placed the Sun and not the Earth and the center of the universe — contradicted 14th-century beliefs.






The Four Books of Architecture
Palladio’s country villas, urban palazzos, and churches combined modern features with classical Roman principles. His designs were hailed as ‘the quintessence of High Renaissance calm and harmony.’






Flush Toilet (John Harington, 1596)
The text accompanying Harington’s diagram identified A as the ‘Cesterne,’ D as the ‘seate boord,’ H as the ‘stoole pot,’ and L as the ‘sluce.’ If used correctly, ‘your worst privie may be as sweet as your best chamber.’

A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web.

Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earthorder the heavensmake sense of timedissect the human bodyorganize the natural world,perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love100 Diagrams That Changed the World (UKpublic library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinatorial, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines. Christianson writes in the introduction:

It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge. Most arose from collaboration (and oftentimes in competition) with others. Each was a product and a reflection of its unique cultural, historical and political environment. Each represented specific preoccupations, interests, and stake holders.

[…]

The great diagrams depicted in the book form the basis for many fields — art, astronomy, cartography, chemistry, mathematics, engineering, history, communications, particle physics, and space travel among others. More often than not, however, their creators — mostly known, but many lost to time — were polymaths who are creating new technologies or breakthroughs by drawing from a potent combination of disciplines. By applying trigonometric methods to the heavens, or by harnessing the movement of the sun and the planets to keep time, they were forging powerful new tools; their diagrams were imbued with synergy.

Rosetta Stone (196 BC)

Discovered in 1799, this granite block containing a decree written in three languages allowed Egyptologists to interpret hieroglyphics for the first time — a language that had been out of use since the fourth century AD.

The Ptolemaic System (Claudus Ptolemy, c. AD 140-150)

This 1568 illuminated illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system, ‘Figura dos Corpos Celestes’ (Four Heavenly Bodies), is by the Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velbo.

Ptolemy’s World Map (Claudius Ptolemy, c. AD 150)

In this 15th-century example of the Ptolemaic world map, the Indian Ocean is enclosed and there is no sea route around the Cape. The ‘inhabited’ (Old) World is massively inflated.

Lunar Eclipse (Abu Rayhan al-Biruni, 1019)

An illustration showing the different phases of the moon from al-Biruni’s manuscript copy of his Kitab al-Tafhim (Book of Instruction on the Principles of the Art of Astrology)

Christianson offers a definition:

diagram

From the latin diagramma (figure) from Greek, a figure worked out b lines, plan, from diagraphein, from graphein to write.

First known use of the word: 1619.

  1. A plan, a sketch, drawing, outline, not necessarily representational, designed to demonstrate or explain something or clarify the relationship existing between the parts of the whole.
  2. In mathematics, a graphic representation of an algebraic or geometric relationship. A chart or graph.
  3. A drawing or plan that outlines and explains the parts, operation, etc. of something: a diagram of an engine.

Dante’s Divine Comedy (Dante Alighieri, 1308-21)

A 19th-century interpretation of Dante’s map of Hell. The level of suffering and wickedness increases on the downward journey through the inferno’s nine layers. No original copies of Dante’s manuscript survive.

Vitruvian Man (Leonardo da Vinci, c. 1487

This sketch, and the notes that go with it, show how da Vinci understood the proportions of the human body. The head measured from the forehead to the chin was exactly one tenth of the total height, and the outstretched arms were always as wide as the body was tall.

Human Body (Andreas Vesalius, 1543)

Vesalius’s revolutionary anatomical treatise, De Humani Corporis Fabrica, shows the dissected body in unusually animated poses. These detailed diagrams are perhaps the most famous illustrations in all of medical history.

Heliocentric Universe (Nicolaus Copernicus, 1543)

Copernicus’s revolutionary view of the universe was crystallized in this simple yet disconcerting line drawing. His heliocentric model — which placed the Sun and not the Earth and the center of the universe — contradicted 14th-century beliefs.

The Four Books of Architecture

Palladio’s country villas, urban palazzos, and churches combined modern features with classical Roman principles. His designs were hailed as ‘the quintessence of High Renaissance calm and harmony.’

Flush Toilet (John Harington, 1596)

The text accompanying Harington’s diagram identified A as the ‘Cesterne,’ D as the ‘seate boord,’ H as the ‘stoole pot,’ and L as the ‘sluce.’ If used correctly, ‘your worst privie may be as sweet as your best chamber.’

photo


(POP)cultureGarth Britzman, Designer





This project reused recycled soda bottles as a canopy under which a small park is created. An intriguing environment is created where one can explore the surface qualities of the bottles at eye level. Additionally, this project sought to stimulate creative alternatives for recycling and reusing materials.
  • (POP)culture
    Garth Britzman, Designer

  • This project reused recycled soda bottles as a canopy under which a small park is created. An intriguing environment is created where one can explore the surface qualities of the bottles at eye level. Additionally, this project sought to stimulate creative alternatives for recycling and reusing materials.

photos

kqedscience:

New species discovered in Suriname 

An armored catfish, a Pac-Man frog and a cowboy frog were some of the 1,300 species documented during a scientific survey conducted by Conservation International in southwest Suriname in 2010. Their finds included 46 potentially new species.

According to a press release, Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program traveled to three locations along the Kutari and Sipaliwini Rivers “in an effort to document the region’s poorly known biodiversity and help develop sustainable ecotourism opportunities for the local indigenous people.”

The findings from the expedition were published in the RAP Bulletin of Biological Assessment series, “A Rapid Biological Assessment of the Kwamalasamatu region, Southwestern Suriname.”

More species were discovered around the world this month, including the world’s tiniest vertebrate, found in New Guinea. Off the eastern coast of Australia, scientists encountered the world’s first hybrid shark.

Check out photos and a video of the new and observed species discovered by the Rapid Assessment Program below (Captions courtesy of Conservation International):