"Everything Old Was Once New

and until explored unfamiliar and dangerous..."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



Cheeky & Geeky Se Moi;

Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


DISCLAIMER: I do not own the photos published here, unless stated.

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A girl worth fighting for!



Although Mulan is not my favorite of Disney’s female persuasion (it’s actually Ariel & Pocahontas ^_^), she does hold a special place for me the other ones don’t. Drawing Mulan actually takes me back to my formative years in college due to one particular animation professor. During my senior year there was a new teacher that no one knew anything about or what he taught. It was like this weird mystery professor but the mystery was revealed on the first day of class. He was a former animator of Disney, Warner Brothers, and Dreamworks who had his hand in all the recent classics. One in particular, Mulan. As our assignment, he would give us the actual model sheets the real Disney animators would use from Mulan, to draw new poses and were graded on how well we kept them on model. He had tons of handouts he collected over the years at Disney, even actual drawings from Glen Keane! He was an absolute well of knowledge to whom I largely give credit to my growing skills in my career today. When I started this drawing, I had dusted off my old college portfolio and pulled out his old model sheets to help me out, even with the original syllabus stapled to it! So as I post this ten years after taking his class (boy I’m old) I hope I do him proud :-)

(via Ralph Sevelius: A girl worth fighting for!)

A girl worth fighting for!

Although Mulan is not my favorite of Disney’s female persuasion (it’s actually Ariel & Pocahontas ^_^), she does hold a special place for me the other ones don’t. Drawing Mulan actually takes me back to my formative years in college due to one particular animation professor. During my senior year there was a new teacher that no one knew anything about or what he taught. It was like this weird mystery professor but the mystery was revealed on the first day of class. He was a former animator of Disney, Warner Brothers, and Dreamworks who had his hand in all the recent classics. One in particular, Mulan. As our assignment, he would give us the actual model sheets the real Disney animators would use from Mulan, to draw new poses and were graded on how well we kept them on model. He had tons of handouts he collected over the years at Disney, even actual drawings from Glen Keane! He was an absolute well of knowledge to whom I largely give credit to my growing skills in my career today. When I started this drawing, I had dusted off my old college portfolio and pulled out his old model sheets to help me out, even with the original syllabus stapled to it! So as I post this ten years after taking his class (boy I’m old) I hope I do him proud :-)

(via Ralph Sevelius: A girl worth fighting for!)

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hargashouseofribs:

delicious-mindmush:

niuniente:

novice-city:

masterassassino:

p0tat0s:

yusufdaistanboo:

jambandit:

ninjamooseofthemist:

borderlans 2 and pokemon 
immmmm nooooot suuuuure abooouuut thiiiiiis

professor layton and dragon age  I thiiink???
that sounds
so cool tho

Pokemon Y and AC4 *v*;

Assassin’s Creed and [Prototype]
perfection

Battlefield 4 and Assassin’s Creed 4. MILITARY ASSASSINS.

fallout new vegas and assassin’s creed 4… POST APOCALYPTIC PIRATE ASSASSINS YOOOOO

Katamari and Dead Space. WAIT WHAT

Minecraft and Skyrim.
I can dig that.

Max Payne 3 and Black Ops 2: Zombies
Bullet Time Zombie Apocalypse? Sounds good. 

Fallout New Vegas (Honest Hearts dlc) and Angry Birds Go!
I really want a not-so-serious racing game with V.A.T.S. now!

hargashouseofribs:

delicious-mindmush:

niuniente:

novice-city:

masterassassino:

p0tat0s:

yusufdaistanboo:

jambandit:

ninjamooseofthemist:

borderlans 2 and pokemon 

immmmm nooooot suuuuure abooouuut thiiiiiis

professor layton and dragon age  I thiiink???

that sounds

so cool tho

Pokemon Y and AC4 
*v*;

Assassin’s Creed and [Prototype]

perfection

Battlefield 4 and Assassin’s Creed 4.
MILITARY ASSASSINS.

fallout new vegas and assassin’s creed 4… POST APOCALYPTIC PIRATE ASSASSINS YOOOOO

Katamari and Dead Space. WAIT WHAT

Minecraft and Skyrim.

I can dig that.

Max Payne 3 and Black Ops 2: Zombies

Bullet Time Zombie Apocalypse? Sounds good. 

Fallout New Vegas (Honest Hearts dlc) and Angry Birds Go!

I really want a not-so-serious racing game with V.A.T.S. now!

(Source: weasselk)

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yowulf:

I am asking for your help.. I don’t want to bore you all with a novel of a post explaining my situation so I will try to keep it as short as possible. I understand all of you are busy.



My twin sister, Koisnake, and I, to be frank, are currently at risk losing our home. The only working adults in our family is our mother and us. Our mother recently got sick and will need to go to the hospital (a terrible tooth infection) that left untreated, may become fatal.. We have to take care of our six year old brother while she recovers. My mother is out of a job right now and can’t work due to her infection. We are currently at college and juggling studies and jobs is just too much for us. We may be forced to drop college again get second jobs so we can pay all the bills and take care of the family. We need to raise $2100 dollars in order to keep our home..
We are down on our luck now and we are incredibly stressed.. we don’t know what to do so I am asking for your help..
I am open for illustration and hat commissions. I feel too guilty asking for donations since your money is very valuable and I’d feel terribly if you didn’t get anything in return.. Info for hat commissions can be found here and my Etsy is here. For illustrations, I charge about $20 for a character commission, $10 for each additional character. They will be full colored! Noemi, although an extremely talented sculptor and costume maker, is unable to take commissions due to taking the bulk of the hours at work so I will be the one accepting art/hat commissions.
If you can signal boost, that would make my day and I give you my humbled gratitude.
(Like the illustration but not my story? Feel free to remove.. I won’t be offended.)

yowulf:

I am asking for your help.. I don’t want to bore you all with a novel of a post explaining my situation so I will try to keep it as short as possible. I understand all of you are busy.

My twin sister, Koisnake, and I, to be frank, are currently at risk losing our home. The only working adults in our family is our mother and us. Our mother recently got sick and will need to go to the hospital (a terrible tooth infection) that left untreated, may become fatal.. We have to take care of our six year old brother while she recovers. My mother is out of a job right now and can’t work due to her infection. We are currently at college and juggling studies and jobs is just too much for us. We may be forced to drop college again get second jobs so we can pay all the bills and take care of the family. We need to raise $2100 dollars in order to keep our home..

We are down on our luck now and we are incredibly stressed.. we don’t know what to do so I am asking for your help..

I am open for illustration and hat commissions. I feel too guilty asking for donations since your money is very valuable and I’d feel terribly if you didn’t get anything in return.. Info for hat commissions can be found here and my Etsy is here. For illustrations, I charge about $20 for a character commission, $10 for each additional character. They will be full colored! Noemi, although an extremely talented sculptor and costume maker, is unable to take commissions due to taking the bulk of the hours at work so I will be the one accepting art/hat commissions.

If you can signal boost, that would make my day and I give you my humbled gratitude.

(Like the illustration but not my story? Feel free to remove.. I won’t be offended.)

(via scienceetfiction)

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Photographer James Friedman doesn’t play golf, but he had a collection of golf balls lying around. One day, he began to wonder what the guts of the golf balls look like, so he cut a ball open to take a peek at a core. Then he sliced open another, and another; after cutting open over twenty different types of golf balls, Friedman found a strange sort of beauty that he began to document through photographs. The resulting project is titled “Interior Design“.
The photographs reveal a tiny world of strange shapes, layers, and colors. The Ohio-based photographer says that he was surprised to find “elegant formal qualities, unpredictable color schemes and metaphor” in the “unlikeliest of places.”
Some of the balls have guts that look like something you’d see when peering into a microscope in a laboratory. Others look like illustrations showing cross sections of planets. Others look like abstract circles of color and texture.
Here’s the collection of golf ball photographs Friedman created:




This project led Friedman to become more interested in the subject of abstraction. He ordinarily works as a documentary photographer, he says that these abstract photos of tiny-scale objects are an “exciting corollary” to his other work.
If you enjoyed these images, be sure to check out photographer Sabine Pearlman’s cross section photographs of bullets.
(via Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within)

Photographer James Friedman doesn’t play golf, but he had a collection of golf balls lying around. One day, he began to wonder what the guts of the golf balls look like, so he cut a ball open to take a peek at a core. Then he sliced open another, and another; after cutting open over twenty different types of golf balls, Friedman found a strange sort of beauty that he began to document through photographs. The resulting project is titled “Interior Design“.

The photographs reveal a tiny world of strange shapes, layers, and colors. The Ohio-based photographer says that he was surprised to find “elegant formal qualities, unpredictable color schemes and metaphor” in the “unlikeliest of places.”

Some of the balls have guts that look like something you’d see when peering into a microscope in a laboratory. Others look like illustrations showing cross sections of planets. Others look like abstract circles of color and texture.

Here’s the collection of golf ball photographs Friedman created:

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 1

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 2

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 3

Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within interiordesign 23

This project led Friedman to become more interested in the subject of abstraction. He ordinarily works as a documentary photographer, he says that these abstract photos of tiny-scale objects are an “exciting corollary” to his other work.

If you enjoyed these images, be sure to check out photographer Sabine Pearlman’s cross section photographs of bullets.

(via Cross Section Photos of Golf Balls Reveal the Diverse Beauty Within)

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While it’s cool that this silicone character can secure your instant noodles when they’re cooking, the cooler part is that the figure changes color after three minutes. You’ll never have to repeatedly check your phone to see how long your Cup Noodles have been cooking again.
 
Japan has a reputation for producing some downright weird stuff.
In fact, the word “chindogu” even refers to inventions that are technically practical, but utterly eccentric in their execution. These products are so bizarre, they’re not actually meant to be produced.
SEE ALSO: Eyeball Licking: Japan’s Craziest New Fetish
But many questionably useful Japanese products actually exist in circulation, and we’re defending some of the “strange” ones. Sure, they may be a bit excessive — but useless? Not quite.
1. Banana Keeper




Image courtesy of Daiso
Have you ever experienced a squished banana at the bottom of your bag? Not fun. Not fun at all.
2. Urusakunai Kara OK! Mute Microphone USB




Image courtesy of JTT
Admittedly, this microphone looks ridiculous. Fortunately, it is not meant to be used in public.
This gadget is perfect for belting out tunes when you don’t want to disturb your neighbors — or when you just don’t want to hear the sound of your own singing voice. (Your hairbrush can’t do that.)
3. Dictionary Desk Pillow




Image courtesy of Japan Trend Shop
Perfect for a mid-work pick-me-up, or just as a nice, easily portable pillow or seat cushion.
4. Photograph Yourself Arm




Image courtesy of Thanko
Sometimes selfies are really difficult.
5. Easy Butter Former




Image courtesy of Metex
One pat of butter magically transforms into ribbons and ribbons of buttery goodness, so you get a lot more butter for your buck … er, yen.
6. Sound-Catch Cubic Pillow




Image courtesy of Strapya World
This invention allows you to hear music or television shows when lying down. While this probably shouldn’t be an element of your daily media consumption, it’s the kind of thing that could be pretty useful when you’re sick and can only lie in bed all day. Or if you’re just really lazy every day.
(via 10 Weird Japanese Products That Are Actually Kind of Useful)

While it’s cool that this silicone character can secure your instant noodles when they’re cooking, the cooler part is that the figure changes color after three minutes. You’ll never have to repeatedly check your phone to see how long your Cup Noodles have been cooking again.

 

Japan has a reputation for producing some downright weird stuff.

In fact, the word “chindogu” even refers to inventions that are technically practical, but utterly eccentric in their execution. These products are so bizarre, they’re not actually meant to be produced.

But many questionably useful Japanese products actually exist in circulation, and we’re defending some of the “strange” ones. Sure, they may be a bit excessive — but useless? Not quite.

1. Banana Keeper

banana holder case daiso

Image courtesy of Daiso

Have you ever experienced a squished banana at the bottom of your bag? Not fun. Not fun at all.

2. Urusakunai Kara OK! Mute Microphone USB

jtt usb microphone soundproof cup

Image courtesy of JTT

Admittedly, this microphone looks ridiculous. Fortunately, it is not meant to be used in public.

This gadget is perfect for belting out tunes when you don’t want to disturb your neighbors — or when you just don’t want to hear the sound of your own singing voice. (Your hairbrush can’t do that.)

3. Dictionary Desk Pillow

japanese dictionary pillow

Image courtesy of Japan Trend Shop

Perfect for a mid-work pick-me-up, or just as a nice, easily portable pillow or seat cushion.

4. Photograph Yourself Arm

photograph yourself arm smartphone

Image courtesy of Thanko

Sometimes selfies are really difficult.

5. Easy Butter Former

metex easy butter former grater

Image courtesy of Metex

One pat of butter magically transforms into ribbons and ribbons of buttery goodness, so you get a lot more butter for your buck … er, yen.

6. Sound-Catch Cubic Pillow

catch sounds cubic pillow japan lazy

Image courtesy of Strapya World

This invention allows you to hear music or television shows when lying down. While this probably shouldn’t be an element of your daily media consumption, it’s the kind of thing that could be pretty useful when you’re sick and can only lie in bed all day. Or if you’re just really lazy every day.

(via 10 Weird Japanese Products That Are Actually Kind of Useful)

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LED-packing USB cable minimizes after-dark phone-charging fumbles



This simple but useful concept is not yet available, however. Its creator, Dustin Orndorff from Winchester (VA), has hit the pages of Kickstarter to bring his idea to market. The early bird specials have all been snapped up by eager after-dark gadget users, so anyone wanting to secure a 3 ft USB Micro Light charging cable will have to stump up at least US$14, while the 6 ft version will require a pledge of $16.
(via LED-packing USB cable minimizes after-dark phone-charging fumbles)

LED-packing USB cable minimizes after-dark phone-charging fumbles

The USB Micro Light charging cable has an LED light integrated into its micro-USB connecto...

This simple but useful concept is not yet available, however. Its creator, Dustin Orndorff from Winchester (VA), has hit the pages of Kickstarter to bring his idea to market. The early bird specials have all been snapped up by eager after-dark gadget users, so anyone wanting to secure a 3 ft USB Micro Light charging cable will have to stump up at least US$14, while the 6 ft version will require a pledge of $16.

(via LED-packing USB cable minimizes after-dark phone-charging fumbles)

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Awesome Storyboards from 15 of Your Favorite Films
Star Wars (1977)Director: George LucasStoryboard Artist: Joe Johnston







Aliens (1986)Director: James CameronStoryboard Artists: Roger Dear, Maciek Piotrowski, Denis Rich







No Country for Old Men (2007)Director: Joel and Ethan CoenStoryboard Artist: J. Todd Anderson




(via Awesome Storyboards from 15 of Your Favorite Films – Flavorwire)

Awesome Storyboards from 15 of Your Favorite Films

Star Wars (1977)
Director: George Lucas
Storyboard Artist: Joe Johnston

Aliens (1986)
Director: James Cameron
Storyboard Artists: Roger Dear, Maciek Piotrowski, Denis Rich

No Country for Old Men (2007)
Director: Joel and Ethan Coen
Storyboard Artist: J. Todd Anderson

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(via Awesome Storyboards from 15 of Your Favorite Films – Flavorwire)

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KNITTING CLOCK
Nov 16, 2012 · Design

The 365 Knitting Clock by Sirene Elise Wilhelmsen is stitching the time as it passes by. It is knitting 24 hours a day and one year at the time, showing the physical representation of time as a creative and tangible force. After 365 days the clock has turned the passed year into a 2 m long scarf. Now the past can be carried out in the future and the upcoming year is hiding in a new spool of thread, still unknitted.





(via KNITTING CLOCK | iGNANT.de)

KNITTING CLOCK

The 365 Knitting Clock by Sirene Elise Wilhelmsen is stitching the time as it passes by. It is knitting 24 hours a day and one year at the time, showing the physical representation of time as a creative and tangible force. After 365 days the clock has turned the passed year into a 2 m long scarf. Now the past can be carried out in the future and the upcoming year is hiding in a new spool of thread, still unknitted.

(via KNITTING CLOCK | iGNANT.de)

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Origami Owlets and Other Foldable Creature Cuteness


First, we brought you RoboZoo. And while mechanical animals are cool, we still love paper. So we rounded up an ark-full of origami bears, birds and bugs.
Wildlife biologist Bernie Peyton has been working with origami for more than 50 years, almost as long as he’s been interested in conservation. Peyton, who has a doctorate in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, wants to enliven environmental issues for the masses, and origami, he says, appeals to people of all ages.
"I write a lot of boring [academic] articles nobody reads, but conservation also has to appeal to the emotional side," Peyton told Wired. "That’s why I do art."
He chose origami because its fragility complements “the ephemeral nature of our world,” he said.  Plus, he uses his experience as a field biologist to inform how he molds paper into cacti, bears, kangaroo rats, snakes and polar bears, all of which he’s spent considerable time with.
"I don’t fold anything I don’t have a personal experience with," he said.
"The decades I spent as a field biologist enabled me to breath life into my own creations," he writes on his website.
He recently showcased some of his creations during the Bay Area Science Festival Nov. 1 and 2 at a gallery in Berkeley. Enjoy.



(via Origami Owlets and Other Foldable Creature Cuteness | Wired Science | Wired.com)

Origami Owlets and Other Foldable Creature Cuteness

Polar Bears

Red-eyed Frogs

(via Origami Owlets and Other Foldable Creature Cuteness | Wired Science | Wired.com)

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Martin Hunt was studying math at Southampton University when he decided to start designing origami Star Wars vessels. He became obsessed with the X-wing, and then quickly moved on to other ships and droids — lots of others. He’s now got more than 20 creations from the franchise on his website, starwarigami.co.uk, and a list of 83 more for future designs.
He attributes some of his proficiency to his math degree, saying origami isn’t just art, it’s also science.
"The rules of what you can do with a single square of paper are fixed," he says. "It’s not just a case of putting brush to paper and letting your imagination run riot."
Hunt is taking his creations to the wider world. In October, he exhibited some large-scale versions at the London MCM Expo and Comic Con, and he’s seeking a publisher for a book. But he’s sharing some of his designs already, through his website and on YouTube. He’s not the only one out there doing it — Chris Alexander of starwarsorigami.com just released a book — but Hunt’s designs veer toward the more complicated and intricate. He recommends them for intermediate to advanced origami artists, but that didn’t stop us fromtrying our inept hands at the Naboo Starfighter.
X-wing
What else but the X-wing could have been Hunt’s first origami starfighter? He began with the base from a traditional origami frog, and took the ship through three iterations before settling on the version pictured. He’s also offered step-by-step instructions to building the first edition (see steps 1-17 below).
"The use of the colored side of the paper to form the stripe on the wings was more luck than judgement," he adds.


R2-D2
Everybody’s favorite droid makes an appearance in Hunt’s gallery, of course. (If C-3PO is your favorite droid, you’re doing it wrong.) Hunt went so far as to bring this little R2 unit to the 2012 London Film and Comic Con, where it had the chance to meet Kenny Baker, the actor who played the little droid.
While some of Hunt’s easier designs can be made in 15 minutes, R2-D2 can take up to two hours — a long time for a form that’s based off a paper square draped over his finger. But it’s not just a crumpled tube; Hunt used precise geometrical patterns to pleat the body, align the holo projector and utility tool, and lock the whole thing down.


AT-AT
The crease pattern for Hunt’s AT-AT walker is available on his page, but to the non-initiated, it looks like a mess of square and diagonal lines. It’s more of a reference for Hunt than a how-to, but he uses blue and red lines to indicate “mountain” and “valley” folds, respectively.
"To recreate one of my designs, I start by pre-creasing the paper in all the right places, and then try and collapse the paper into the model’s base, which can be a very frustrating process, involving clothes pegs, an extra pair of hands, and a lot of patience," Hunt says. "But once you get enough of the base into position, it reaches a critical mass and the rest can just fall into place naturally."



Millennium Falcon
The challenge in creating Solo’s ride was hitting the right proportions for the cockpit and the satellite dish, says Hunt. He wound up feeding a flap from the bottom up through the model, in order to get the dish on top.

(via Fold a Paper R2-D2 and Other Awesome Star Wars Origami | Wired Design | Wired.com)

(via Fold a Paper R2-D2 and Other Awesome Star Wars Origami | Wired Design | Wired.com)