Everyone should occasionally break the law

in some small and delightful way,
it’s good for the hygiene of the brain."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



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Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


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Posts tagged art

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You might already be whittling away a mind-numbing Wednesday afternoon at work with some internet thing or another, but if it’s not this free 8-bit Game of Thrones platformer game, you’re probably doing it wrong.

The game is the brainchild (and gift, really) of Abel Alves, an engineering draftsman and comics artist living in Uruguay. His game (available for free download here) is multi-level side-scroller complete with Jon Snow, Daenerys Targaryen, Tyrion Lannister (!), and even Davos Seaworth (!!) that plays like all the Sega games – Sonic the Hedgehog and the Wonder Boy series among them – that Alves grew up playing. The kicker? He made the best Game of Thrones videogame we’ve seen yet, despite having a degree in law — and not, you know, computer science.

(via Go Play This 8-Bit Version of Game of Thrones Immediately | Underwire | Wired.com)

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Fong Qi Wei knows he cannot stop time, but that hasn’t stopped him from harnessing it to create elaborate prints that capture its passage.


For his latest series, “Time Is a Dimension” the Singapore-based photographer spends from two to four hours at a time shooting locations during sunrise and sunset to record dramatic shifts in light that offer maximum contrast. Once he has the images, Fong then layers the various exposures digitally to create collage prints that illustrate the relationship between time and light.

Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013
Fong Qi Wei




Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013
Fong Qi Wei




Marina Sunset, 2013
Fong Qi Wei




(via Fong Qi Wei: “Time Is a Dimension” are photographic collages that mark the passage of time (PHOTOS).)

Fong Qi Wei knows he cannot stop time, but that hasn’t stopped him from harnessing it to create elaborate prints that capture its passage.

For his latest series, “Time Is a Dimension” the Singapore-based photographer spends from two to four hours at a time shooting locations during sunrise and sunset to record dramatic shifts in light that offer maximum contrast. Once he has the images, Fong then layers the various exposures digitally to create collage prints that illustrate the relationship between time and light.

Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013
Pearls Centre Sunset, 2013

Fong Qi Wei

Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013. All Rights Reserved.
Kite Flying at West Coast (Sunset), 2013

Fong Qi Wei

Marina Sunset, 2013
Marina Sunset, 2013

Fong Qi Wei

(via Fong Qi Wei: “Time Is a Dimension” are photographic collages that mark the passage of time (PHOTOS).)

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The Periodic Table of the Muppets
A comprehensive depiction of many memorable Muppet characters from throughout the years (and some not-so-memorable ones as well). Each square represents a different character and indicates the primary Muppeteer(s) for that character, as well as the year and production in which the character made its debut. Borders align with hair/hat colour, background aligns with skin/fur colour, and colour of the abbreviated name represents nose colour (for characters with noses that is).
(via Mike BaBoon Design: The Periodic Table of the Muppets)

The Periodic Table of the Muppets

A comprehensive depiction of many memorable Muppet characters from throughout the years (and some not-so-memorable ones as well). 

Each square represents a different character and indicates the primary Muppeteer(s) for that character, as well as the year and production in which the character made its debut. Borders align with hair/hat colour, background aligns with skin/fur colour, and colour of the abbreviated name represents nose colour (for characters with noses that is).

(via Mike BaBoon Design: The Periodic Table of the Muppets)

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FACTS SO ROMANTIC ON CULTURE
Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee
There is more to the world than meets the human eye, a fact that hit home for the 18th-century astronomer Sir Frederick William Herschel when he discovered infrared light—a wavelength of light that lies just outside the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We can feel its heat, but we can’t see the light—not without special equipment designed to be sensitive in this regime.
(via Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus)

FACTS SO ROMANTIC ON CULTURE

Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee

There is more to the world than meets the human eye, a fact that hit home for the 18th-century astronomer Sir Frederick William Herschel when he discovered infrared light—a wavelength of light that lies just outside the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We can feel its heat, but we can’t see the light—not without special equipment designed to be sensitive in this regime.

(via Looking at Art Through Different Eyes—Like a Bee - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus)

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shinyslingback:

Spectrum of Colors Revealed Through Lit String

British artist, physicist, and all-around science enthusiast Paul Friedlander produces kinetic light sculptures that provide a colorful feast for the eyes. Each piece in his body of work offers a visual medley of light and motion by rapidly rotating a piece of string through white light. The vibrating rope becomes invisible to the human eye, but colors from the light (which would normally be invisible to the naked eye) are revealed in rapid succession.

The scientific artist gives insight into the history of his career shift into the arts and explains the science in it all: “I decided to focus on kinetic art: a subject in which I could bring together my divided background and combine my knowledge of physics with my love of light. In 1983, at London’s ICA, I exhibited the first sculptures to use chromastrobic light, a discovery I had made the previous year. Chromastrobic light changes color faster than the eye can see, causing the appearance of rapidly moving forms to mutate in the most remarkable ways.”

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/paul-friedlander-kinetic-light-sculptures

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 Red Star Motel is the clever, action-packed series by Beijing photographer Chi Lei, “Chili”, that reads like an unraveling drama brimming with sex, drugs, murder and chaos. Each scene is set in an identical divey Beijing motel room where Chili supplies us with plenty of voyeuristic moments to witness. The images are linked together through subtle visual clues that have been woven throughout, encouraging the viewer to take part and piece together the story.

 Red Star Motel is the clever, action-packed series by Beijing photographer Chi Lei, “Chili”, that reads like an unraveling drama brimming with sex, drugs, murder and chaos. Each scene is set in an identical divey Beijing motel room where Chili supplies us with plenty of voyeuristic moments to witness. The images are linked together through subtle visual clues that have been woven throughout, encouraging the viewer to take part and piece together the story.

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

Chili_Photography

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The British Library has been digitizing some of its prize pieces and they announced a new round of six artifacts had been completed including Beowulf, a gold-ink penned Gospel, and one of Leonardo Da Vinci’s notebooks.
"Each of these six manuscripts is a true splendour, and has immense significance in its respective field, whether that be Anglo-Saxon literature, Carolingian or Flemish art, or Renaissance science and learning," Julian Harrison, the library’s curator of medieval artifacts, blogged. “On Digitised Manuscripts you’ll be able to view every page in full and in colour, and to see the finer details using the deep zoom facility.”
All of these texts can be appreciated on a visual level, particularly because the scans are so good. Even the grain of the paper is fascinating.
(via Leonardo’s Notebook Digitized in All Its Befuddling Glory - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic)

The British Library has been digitizing some of its prize pieces and they announced a new round of six artifacts had been completed including Beowulf, a gold-ink penned Gospel, and one of Leonardo Da Vinci’s notebooks.

"Each of these six manuscripts is a true splendour, and has immense significance in its respective field, whether that be Anglo-Saxon literature, Carolingian or Flemish art, or Renaissance science and learning," Julian Harrison, the library’s curator of medieval artifacts, blogged. “On Digitised Manuscripts you’ll be able to view every page in full and in colour, and to see the finer details using the deep zoom facility.”

All of these texts can be appreciated on a visual level, particularly because the scans are so good. Even the grain of the paper is fascinating.

(via Leonardo’s Notebook Digitized in All Its Befuddling Glory - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic)

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12 Piano notes made visible for the first time Shannon Novak, a New Zealand-born fine artist, commissioned us to image 12 piano notes as inspiration for a series of 12 musical canvases. We decided to image the notes in video mode because when we observed the ‘A1’ note we discovered, surprisingly, that the energy envelope changes over time as the string’s harmonics mix in the piano’s wooden bridge. Instead of the envelope being fairly stable, as we had imagined, the harmonics actually cause the CymaGlyphs to be wonderfully dynamic. Our ears can easily detect the changes in the harmonics and the CymaScope now reveals them—probably a first in acoustic physics.
(via Musicology :: Cymascope Research)

12 Piano notes made visible for the first time 

Shannon Novak, a New Zealand-born fine artist, commissioned us to image 12 piano notes as inspiration for a series of 12 musical canvases. We decided to image the notes in video mode because when we observed the ‘A1’ note we discovered, surprisingly, that the energy envelope changes over time as the string’s harmonics mix in the piano’s wooden bridge. Instead of the envelope being fairly stable, as we had imagined, the harmonics actually cause the CymaGlyphs to be wonderfully dynamic. Our ears can easily detect the changes in the harmonics and the CymaScope now reveals them—probably a first in acoustic physics.

(via Musicology :: Cymascope Research)

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Chinese artist Li Liao’s latest project is equal parts conceptual and journalistic. He did something Mike Daisey never quite accomplished: Li got a job at one of the Foxconn plants in Shenzhen that manufacturers most of Apple’s products and worked there for 45 days, undercover, inspecting circuit boards. With the wages he earned, he bought the product of his labor — an iPad.
The piece is a circular commentary on production and consumption, a demonstration of how disconnected the factory workers are from the goods they make.
(via Chinese Artist Goes Undercover at Foxconn … to Buy an iPad)

Chinese artist Li Liao’s latest project is equal parts conceptual and journalistic. He did something Mike Daisey never quite accomplished: Li got a job at one of the Foxconn plants in Shenzhen that manufacturers most of Apple’s products and worked there for 45 days, undercover, inspecting circuit boards. With the wages he earned, he bought the product of his labor — an iPad.

The piece is a circular commentary on production and consumption, a demonstration of how disconnected the factory workers are from the goods they make.

(via Chinese Artist Goes Undercover at Foxconn … to Buy an iPad)

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Barbara was a French singer of Jewish descent who wrote Goettingen about a German city she loved.
The post-war reconciliation between France and Germany was enshrined in a treaty signed 50 years ago. But many believe a song recorded the following year did as much to thaw relations.
Can there be many songs that really did change the world?
There have certainly been records which have been immensely popular - and some of those have had a message. But did they really change the hearts and minds of ordinary people? Did they alter politics?
There is one which did, and it’s barely known now.
Fifty years ago, Germany and France were neighbours where the scars of war were still raw.
Germany had invaded France and been repulsed, inch by bloody inch and town by town. Germans were trying to come to terms not just with total defeat, but with how what they thought was their civilized country had perpetrated one of the great crimes of history. Into this minefield of potential resentment and painful rancour, stepped a slight, soft-voiced chanteuse.
Continue reading the main story
Barbara, the woman in black
Born Monique Serf in Paris in 1930
the second child of a Jewish fur salesman
family had to move several times during the German occupation and even fled one home after being denounced as Jews
studied music in Paris and then moved to Brussels, where she first performed under the name of her maternal grandmother
found considerable success in the 1960s and 70s
always dressed in black on stage
acted, directed and campaigned about HIV
death in 1997 sparked outpouring of grief


(via Did this song change the world?)

Barbara was a French singer of Jewish descent who wrote Goettingen about a German city she loved.

The post-war reconciliation between France and Germany was enshrined in a treaty signed 50 years ago. But many believe a song recorded the following year did as much to thaw relations.

Can there be many songs that really did change the world?

There have certainly been records which have been immensely popular - and some of those have had a message. But did they really change the hearts and minds of ordinary people? Did they alter politics?

There is one which did, and it’s barely known now.

Fifty years ago, Germany and France were neighbours where the scars of war were still raw.

Germany had invaded France and been repulsed, inch by bloody inch and town by town. Germans were trying to come to terms not just with total defeat, but with how what they thought was their civilized country had perpetrated one of the great crimes of history. Into this minefield of potential resentment and painful rancour, stepped a slight, soft-voiced chanteuse.

Barbara, the woman in black

  • Born Monique Serf in Paris in 1930
  • the second child of a Jewish fur salesman
  • family had to move several times during the German occupation and even fled one home after being denounced as Jews
  • studied music in Paris and then moved to Brussels, where she first performed under the name of her maternal grandmother
  • found considerable success in the 1960s and 70s
  • always dressed in black on stage
  • acted, directed and campaigned about HIV
  • death in 1997 sparked outpouring of grief


(via Did this song change the world?)

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Who else could give us the best illusion this year than Mother Nature herself? Salar de Uyuni, the mystifying salt flat in Bolivia, takes on a giant, mirror-like illusion when it is covered in water. As the world’s largest salt flat, Salar de Uyuni is a must-visit destination for anyone who ever has a chance to visit Bolivia, especially in the rainy season.

5. Boy Crossed a Rickety Bridge
Nikolaj Arndt churned out one of our favorite illusions this year that’s simply called the Bridge. It shows a young boy precariously crossing a rickety wooden bridge with a gaping hole right underneath his feet. The 3D street art illusionist is a true master at at making us believe that hidden worlds exist beneath us.
4. Crocodiles in Your Home
Russian-born artist Nikolaj Arndt painted this piece of crocodiles snapping at a person inside a home. The anamorphic artwork gave the illusion that a swampy lake existed just underneath the wooden floors. How cool would it be if this was the latest home decorating trend?
3. Crumbling Gotham City
Joe & Max are the team behind some of the best street art illusions this year. One of their biggest hits was for Warner Bros.’ release of the movie The Dark Knight Rises. Created on the streets of Madrid, Spain, it showed a bird’s eye view of Gotham City burning below while the Batman symbol shined above.
2. Building You Could Scale (Like Spider-Man)
For both kids and adults alike, the Bâtiment (Building) by Buenos Aires-based artist Leandro Erlich was a delightful, interactive illusion. Exhibited for the first three months of the year in Paris, at the art complex Le 104, the Parisian facade let visitors walk all around the outside of the building, scaling its walls and jumping from window to window.

Who else could give us the best illusion this year than Mother Nature herself? Salar de Uyuni, the mystifying salt flat in Bolivia, takes on a giant, mirror-like illusion when it is covered in water. As the world’s largest salt flat, Salar de Uyuni is a must-visit destination for anyone who ever has a chance to visit Bolivia, especially in the rainy season.


5. Boy Crossed a Rickety Bridge

Nikolaj Arndt churned out one of our favorite illusions this year that’s simply called the Bridge. It shows a young boy precariously crossing a rickety wooden bridge with a gaping hole right underneath his feet. The 3D street art illusionist is a true master at at making us believe that hidden worlds exist beneath us.


4. Crocodiles in Your Home

Russian-born artist Nikolaj Arndt painted this piece of crocodiles snapping at a person inside a home. The anamorphic artwork gave the illusion that a swampy lake existed just underneath the wooden floors. How cool would it be if this was the latest home decorating trend?

3. Crumbling Gotham City

Joe & Max are the team behind some of the best street art illusions this year. One of their biggest hits was for Warner Bros.’ release of the movie The Dark Knight Rises. Created on the streets of Madrid, Spain, it showed a bird’s eye view of Gotham City burning below while the Batman symbol shined above.

2. Building You Could Scale (Like Spider-Man)

For both kids and adults alike, the Bâtiment (Building) by Buenos Aires-based artist Leandro Erlich was a delightful, interactive illusion. Exhibited for the first three months of the year in Paris, at the art complex Le 104, the Parisian facade let visitors walk all around the outside of the building, scaling its walls and jumping from window to window.