Everyone should occasionally break the law

in some small and delightful way,
it’s good for the hygiene of the brain."
(Sir Terry Pratchett)



Cheeky & Geeky Se Moi;

Vision, Faith & Attitude!

Nie Hao, Gaat ie, Fawakka?


DISCLAIMER: I do not own the photos published here, unless stated.

photos

l0kasenna:

Ok no seriously, fuck whoever did shoot down that Malaysian Airlines plane.
I work for a local newspaper in the North East of England. We are a small, remote region of the UK with a small population of almost 2.6m (out of the 63m that live in the UK). This tragic incident should have had nothing to do with us. It should have just been a small bit of grout in the national news column in our paper.


But at least 9 Brits died on that flight of 298, and two of them were from Newcastle. Liam Sweeney and John Alder. They were heading to New Zealand to watch Newcastle United play football.


Both of them were die-hard NUFC fans. Liam organised coach trips for fans to follow the team across the country. John was gentleman in his 60’s and had nearly never missed a single Newcastle match home or abroad, he had the nickname ‘the undertaker’ because he wore a suit to every match, no matter the climate. Everybody knew him. Two fans just supporting their beloved team killed by an act of terrorism.

Today, Geordies laid football shirts and flowers at the foot of Sir Bobby Robson’s statue outside St. James’ Park. Today Newcastle mourned two of its sons. The Toon Army grieves the loss of their fellow magpies and wonders how this happened because what does it have to do with us?

Today, instead of putting together galleries of happy prom pictures of local students in pretty dresses like I was meant to, I had to sit and build a gallery of pics of the Malaysia Airlines crash scene. I had to sit and wade through the photos in our media system of the grieving families, the floral tributes at embassies and the wreckage - including the kind of photos that don’t make it to print/online because of the graphic content. I didn’t need to see that today.

The worst photos weren’t even the bodies or the charred bits and pieces; it was the little pink child’s suitcase amongst the pile of surviving luggage. It’s been suggested that 80 kids died on that flight.

So fuck whoever did this, whether it was a rebel group or an entire country, you are poison. And I hope this karma comes back around tenfold.

photo

nurdsite:

My buddy Tom baked a cake for his Argentinian friend to cheer her up after the world cup loss.
…they are no longer friends.

nurdsite:

My buddy Tom baked a cake for his Argentinian friend to cheer her up after the world cup loss.

…they are no longer friends.

(via wishuponastardis)

photo

saulofortz:

Larry Phillips originally shared:



 
The BrachistochroneThis animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: The Brachistochrone Challenge:If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics,Calculus of Variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in Quantum Mechanics and other fields.

saulofortz:

 
The Brachistochrone
This animation is about one of the most significant problems in the history of mathematics: The Brachistochrone Challenge:

If a ball is to roll down a ramp which connects two points, what must be the shape of the ramp’s curve be, such that the descent time is a minimum?

Intuition says that it should be a straight line. That would minimize the distance, but the minimum time happens when the ramp curve is the one shown: a cycloid.

Johann Bernoulli posed the problem to the mathematicians of Europe in 1696, and ultimately, several found the solution. However, a new branch of mathematics,Calculus of Variations, had to be invented to deal with such problems. Today, calculus of variations is vital in Quantum Mechanics and other fields.

(via originalmaja)

photo

bellechere:

comicsalliance:

AVENGERS NOW: A BLACK CAPTAIN AMERICA, A FEMALE THOR, A SUPERIOR IRON MAN, AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR MARVEL AND DIVERSITY
By Andrew Wheeler
On Tuesday morning Whoopi Goldberg and the hosts of The View announced that Marvel will relaunch Thor this October with a female ‘worthy’ brandishing the hammer. Marvel followed that announcement with another high profile switcheroo on Wednesday night as Entertainment Weekly revealed a new-ish and possibly superior Iron Man, and comedian Stephen Colbert joined Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada to announce on The Colbert Report that a new guy is also going to take up Captain America’s shield.
That in itself isn’t much of a surprise — original Cap Steve Rogers has passed on his mantle a few times before before yanking it back. After spending some time in Dimension Z and whatnot, he’s now too old to Avenge from the front lines. The big reveal is that the new Captain America will be Sam Wilson, the African-American superhero currently known as Falcon.
It’s not hard to guess at Marvel’s intentions here. By announcing a female Thor and a black Captain America as a swift one-two punch, the publisher accomplishes two things. First, it shakes up its universe in a way that’s sure to garner attention — as indeed it has. Second, it makes a mission statement.
To the first point; the whole world knows Marvel’s Avengers characters now. That could be a millstone around the publisher’s neck if Marvel put the need to reflect the movies ahead of a need to tell its own stories. Marvel has certainly tried to configure Avengers comics around the on-screen characters, but to no particular success with respect to sales (certainly nothing to indicate that the Avengers are the most popular movie characters in America).
Replacing at least two of its Avengers big three — Thor, Captain America, and Iron Man — suggests Marvel’s commitment to telling its own stories, albeit in a grandstanding, headline-grabbing way. A woman taking the name and role of a male Norse god? A black man representing all of America? These are moves that upset the right people, and that guarantees attention.
Which leads in to the second point. These changes suggest an agenda. I’d call it progressive agenda, but it’s not. Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day. It just happens that there’s a strong regressive agenda in our culture that’s resistant to that kind of change.
Marvel’s only motive here may be to stir up controversy and hope it translates to sales, but I think there’s enough evidence in the publisher’s support for books like Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, and Mighty Avengers, that the publisher is sincere in its efforts to reach out to audiences that traditionally haven’t been well-served by superhero comics. There’s always more work to be done, but Marvel’s output feels more inclusive with every passing quarter.
READ MUCH MORE

"Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day."
This article nails so much of what I’ve been trying to impress on people. It makes me outright happy that a company I love and value is taking these motions, listening to their fans, and balancing the representation.
Make Mine Marvel

bellechere:

comicsalliance:

AVENGERS NOW: A BLACK CAPTAIN AMERICA, A FEMALE THOR, A SUPERIOR IRON MAN, AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR MARVEL AND DIVERSITY

By Andrew Wheeler

On Tuesday morning Whoopi Goldberg and the hosts of The View announced that Marvel will relaunch Thor this October with a female ‘worthy’ brandishing the hammer. Marvel followed that announcement with another high profile switcheroo on Wednesday night as Entertainment Weekly revealed a new-ish and possibly superior Iron Man, and comedian Stephen Colbert joined Marvel Chief Creative Officer Joe Quesada to announce on The Colbert Report that a new guy is also going to take up Captain America’s shield.

That in itself isn’t much of a surprise — original Cap Steve Rogers has passed on his mantle a few times before before yanking it back. After spending some time in Dimension Z and whatnot, he’s now too old to Avenge from the front lines. The big reveal is that the new Captain America will be Sam Wilson, the African-American superhero currently known as Falcon.

It’s not hard to guess at Marvel’s intentions here. By announcing a female Thor and a black Captain America as a swift one-two punch, the publisher accomplishes two things. First, it shakes up its universe in a way that’s sure to garner attention — as indeed it has. Second, it makes a mission statement.

To the first point; the whole world knows Marvel’s Avengers characters now. That could be a millstone around the publisher’s neck if Marvel put the need to reflect the movies ahead of a need to tell its own stories. Marvel has certainly tried to configure Avengers comics around the on-screen characters, but to no particular success with respect to sales (certainly nothing to indicate that the Avengers are the most popular movie characters in America).

Replacing at least two of its Avengers big three — Thor, Captain America, and Iron Man — suggests Marvel’s commitment to telling its own stories, albeit in a grandstanding, headline-grabbing way. A woman taking the name and role of a male Norse god? A black man representing all of America? These are moves that upset the right people, and that guarantees attention.

Which leads in to the second point. These changes suggest an agenda. I’d call it progressive agenda, but it’s not. Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day. It just happens that there’s a strong regressive agenda in our culture that’s resistant to that kind of change.

Marvel’s only motive here may be to stir up controversy and hope it translates to sales, but I think there’s enough evidence in the publisher’s support for books like Ms. MarvelCaptain Marvel, and Mighty Avengers, that the publisher is sincere in its efforts to reach out to audiences that traditionally haven’t been well-served by superhero comics. There’s always more work to be done, but Marvel’s output feels more inclusive with every passing quarter.

READ MUCH MORE

"Putting women and people of color in key positions isn’t progressive, it’s just evidence that superhero comics are slowly catching up to the present day."

This article nails so much of what I’ve been trying to impress on people. It makes me outright happy that a company I love and value is taking these motions, listening to their fans, and balancing the representation.

Make Mine Marvel

(via nudityandnerdery)